Comoros

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has joined the TPNW

Signed: 20 September 2017

Ratified: 19 February 2021

 

Summary

Comoros has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), and has been legally bound by it since 20 May 2021.

 

Signature and ratification

Azali Assoumali, the president of Comoros, signed the TPNW when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017. In an address to the United Nations the same week, he called on nuclear-armed states “to abandon their nuclear weapons programmes”.


Azali Assoumali, the president of Comoros, signs the TPNW in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

In September 2020, the foreign ministry of Comoros and the Association SALAM, an ICAN partner organisation, co-hosted a workshop in the country’s capital, Moroni, to brief members of parliament about the TPNW. The parliament approved ratification of the treaty in December 2020.

The country’s instrument of ratification was deposited with the UN secretary-general on 19 February 2021. Comoros was the 54th state to ratify or accede to the TPNW.

Members of the parliament of Comoros, along with other stakeholders, attend a workshop to learn about the TPNW in September 2020. Photo: ICAN

The parliament of Comoros approves ratification in December 2020. Photo: Al-watwan

 

Implementation

In accordance with Article 2 of the TPNW, Comoros submitted a declaration to the UN secretary-general on 4 May 2021 confirming that it does not own, possess, or control nuclear weapons, has never done so, and does not host any other state’s nuclear weapons on its territory.

Per Article 12, Comoros has promoted universal adherence to the TPNW, including by consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the UN General Assembly in September 2021, Comoros said that “each new signature and ratification of this important legal instrument [the TPNW] strengthens the global norm against the use and possession of nuclear weapons, and brings us even closer to a world free from the nuclear threat”.

In 2019, Comoros said that the treaty “plays an important role in strengthening global standards against the use, proliferation, and possession of nuclear weapons by any state”.

 

TPNW negotiations

Comoros did not formally participate in the negotiation of the TPNW at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In 2016, Comoros voted in favour of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”. However, it subsequently informed the UN secretariat that it had intended to abstain from voting.

 

Before the negotiations

Comoros was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has joined the TPNW

[HIGHLIGHTS]

Signed: 20 September 2017

Ratified: 19 February 2021

 

Summary

Comoros has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), and has been legally bound by it since 20 May 2021.

 

Signature and ratification

Azali Assoumali, the president of Comoros, signed the TPNW when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017. In an address to the United Nations the same week, he called on nuclear-armed states “to abandon their nuclear weapons programmes”.


Azali Assoumali, the president of Comoros, signs the TPNW in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

In September 2020, the foreign ministry of Comoros and the Association SALAM, an ICAN partner organisation, co-hosted a workshop in the country’s capital, Moroni, to brief members of parliament about the TPNW. The parliament approved ratification of the treaty in December 2020.

The country’s instrument of ratification was deposited with the UN secretary-general on 19 February 2021. Comoros was the 54th state to ratify or accede to the TPNW.

Members of the parliament of Comoros, along with other stakeholders, attend a workshop to learn about the TPNW in September 2020. Photo: ICAN

The parliament of Comoros approves ratification in December 2020. Photo: Al-watwan

 

Implementation

In accordance with Article 2 of the TPNW, Comoros submitted a declaration to the UN secretary-general on 4 May 2021 confirming that it does not own, possess, or control nuclear weapons, has never done so, and does not host any other state’s nuclear weapons on its territory.

Per Article 12, Comoros has promoted universal adherence to the TPNW, including by consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the UN General Assembly in September 2021, Comoros said that “each new signature and ratification of this important legal instrument [the TPNW] strengthens the global norm against the use and possession of nuclear weapons, and brings us even closer to a world free from the nuclear threat”.

In 2019, Comoros said that the treaty “plays an important role in strengthening global standards against the use, proliferation, and possession of nuclear weapons by any state”.

 

TPNW negotiations

Comoros did not formally participate in the negotiation of the TPNW at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In 2016, Comoros voted in favour of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”. However, it subsequently informed the UN secretariat that it had intended to abstain from voting.

 

Before the negotiations

Comoros was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

[PARTNERS]

Association SALAM

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