Russia

Nuclear-armed state

Possesses 6,255 nuclear weapons

Has not yet joined the TPNW

Russia has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Nuclear-weapon programme

Russia possesses approximately 6,255 nuclear weapons, which it can launch from missiles, submarines, and aircraft. In 2020, Russia spent an estimated US$8 billion to build and maintain its nuclear weapons.

The former Soviet Union tested 715 nuclear weapons between 1949 and 1990, at the Semipalatinsk Test Site in modern-day Kazakhstan and across modern-day Russia. 

 

National position

Russia has consistently voted against an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that welcomes the adoption of the treaty and calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to it “at the earliest possible date”.

Along with other nuclear-armed states, Russia has said that it does not accept any claim that [the treaty] contributes to the development of customary international law”. It has called on all states that are considering supporting the the treaty to reflect seriously on its implications for international peace and security.

The minister for foreign affairs of Russia, Sergey Lavrov, said in 2019 that the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons cannot be achieved “by the unilateral and rather arrogant methods on which this document [the treaty] is based”.

 

Treaty negotiations

Russia did not participate in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In March 2017, ahead of the commencement of the negotiating conference, Lavrov said: “Efforts to coerce nuclear powers to abandon nuclear weapons have intensified significantly recently. It is absolutely clear that the time has not yet come for that.”

In 2016, Russia voted against the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

ICAN campaigners criticise the decision of nuclear-armed states, including Russia, to boycott the treaty negotiations in 2017. Photo: ICAN

Nuclear-armed state

Possesses 6,255 nuclear weapons

Has not yet joined the TPNW

[HIGHLIGHTS]

Russia has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Nuclear-weapon programme

Russia possesses approximately 6,255 nuclear weapons, which it can launch from missiles, submarines, and aircraft. In 2020, Russia spent an estimated US$8 billion to build and maintain its nuclear weapons.

The former Soviet Union tested 715 nuclear weapons between 1949 and 1990, at the Semipalatinsk Test Site in modern-day Kazakhstan and across modern-day Russia. 

 

National position

Russia has consistently voted against an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that welcomes the adoption of the treaty and calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to it “at the earliest possible date”.

Along with other nuclear-armed states, Russia has said that it does not accept any claim that [the treaty] contributes to the development of customary international law”. It has called on all states that are considering supporting the the treaty to reflect seriously on its implications for international peace and security.

The minister for foreign affairs of Russia, Sergey Lavrov, said in 2019 that the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons cannot be achieved “by the unilateral and rather arrogant methods on which this document [the treaty] is based”.

 

Treaty negotiations

Russia did not participate in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In March 2017, ahead of the commencement of the negotiating conference, Lavrov said: “Efforts to coerce nuclear powers to abandon nuclear weapons have intensified significantly recently. It is absolutely clear that the time has not yet come for that.”

In 2016, Russia voted against the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

ICAN campaigners criticise the decision of nuclear-armed states, including Russia, to boycott the treaty negotiations in 2017. Photo: ICAN

[PARTNERS]

Bellona

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Russian Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW)

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