Finland

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has not yet joined the TPNW

Summary

Finland has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

National position

Finland has consistently abstained from voting on an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that welcomes the adoption of the treaty and calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to it “at the earliest possible date”.

 

Political developments

Three of the five political parties that form the coalition government in Finland have expressed their support for the treaty: the Social Democratic Party, the Green League, and the Left Alliance.

The minister of foreign affairs of Finland, Pekka Haavisto, is one of dozens of Finnish parliamentarians who have pledged to work for their country’s signature and ratification of the treaty. He made this pledge in 2017, prior to assuming the office of foreign minister.

In November 2020, Erkki Tuomioja, a former Finnish foreign minister, voiced his support for the treaty, noting that one of the reasons for Finland’s reluctance to join it to date has been “the displeasure the US would show at such a step”.

The foreign affairs committee of the Finnish parliament issued a statement in 2018 recommending that the government of Finland “continue to analyse the contents of the treaty”.

 

Public opinion

A public opinion poll conducted by Kantar TNS Oy in November 2019 found that 84 per cent of Finns believe that their government should sign the treaty, with 8 per cent opposed to signing and 8 per cent undecided.

 

Treaty negotiations

Finland did not participate in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In 2016, Finland abstained from voting on the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

The president of Finland, Sauli Niinistö, receives one thousand hand-folded paper cranes from Hiroshima, Japan, as part of an ICAN initiative in 2012.

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has not yet joined the TPNW

[HIGHLIGHTS]

Summary

Finland has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

National position

Finland has consistently abstained from voting on an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that welcomes the adoption of the treaty and calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to it “at the earliest possible date”.

 

Political developments

Three of the five political parties that form the coalition government in Finland have expressed their support for the treaty: the Social Democratic Party, the Green League, and the Left Alliance.

The minister of foreign affairs of Finland, Pekka Haavisto, is one of dozens of Finnish parliamentarians who have pledged to work for their country’s signature and ratification of the treaty. He made this pledge in 2017, prior to assuming the office of foreign minister.

In November 2020, Erkki Tuomioja, a former Finnish foreign minister, voiced his support for the treaty, noting that one of the reasons for Finland’s reluctance to join it to date has been “the displeasure the US would show at such a step”.

The foreign affairs committee of the Finnish parliament issued a statement in 2018 recommending that the government of Finland “continue to analyse the contents of the treaty”.

 

Public opinion

A public opinion poll conducted by Kantar TNS Oy in November 2019 found that 84 per cent of Finns believe that their government should sign the treaty, with 8 per cent opposed to signing and 8 per cent undecided.

 

Treaty negotiations

Finland did not participate in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In 2016, Finland abstained from voting on the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

The president of Finland, Sauli Niinistö, receives one thousand hand-folded paper cranes from Hiroshima, Japan, as part of an ICAN initiative in 2012.

[PARTNERS]

Committee of 100 in Finland

website


Finnish Peace Committee - Suomen Rauhanpuolustajat 

website


Peace Union of Finland

website


Physicians for Social Responsibility

website


Technology for life

website


Aseistakieltäytyjäliitto ry (Union of Conscientious Objectors, Finland)

website

[LOCALSUPPORT]

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