Peru

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has signed the TPNW

Has not yet ratified the TPNW

Signed: 20 September 2017

 

Summary

Peru has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW).

 

Signature

Antonio García Revilla, the director-general of multilateral and global affairs at the foreign ministry of Peru, signed the TPNW when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017.

In September 2020, the president of Peru, Martín Vizcarra, announced in a video message to the UN General Assembly that Peru is in the process of ratifying the treaty, “convinced that the prohibition of nuclear weapons and tests continues to be a moral imperative for the planet and the human species”.

Addressing the UN General Assembly in September 2021, the minister of foreign affairs of Peru, Óscar Maúrtua, hailed the TPNW’s entry into force as a “great achievement” and “a legal and moral starting point on a long road to achieve nuclear disarmament”.

Maúrtua added that Peru “has been making every effort for [the TPNW’s] prompt ratification”. The foreign affairs committee of the Peruvian congress approved ratification of the TPNW in July 2021. A plenary decision of the congress is pending.

Antonio García Revilla, a director-general at the foreign ministry of Peru, signs the TPNW in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

 

Universalisation

Peru has promoted universal adherence to the TPNW, including by co-sponsoring and consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the United Nations in 2017, Peru said that it hopes “that all states possessing [nuclear] weapons will join this instrument”.

 

TPNW negotiations

Peru participated in the negotiation of the TPNW at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and was among 122 states that voted in favour of its adoption.

In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Peru said: “What does not exist cannot cause harm. Nuclear weapons simply should not exist.”

It expressed regret in its closing statement that the final treaty text did not contain an explicit prohibition on the transit of nuclear weapons through areas under a state’s jurisdiction, but it accepted that “in a process like this it is impossible to cover the concerns of all states”.

In 2016, Peru co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

 

Before the negotiations

Peru was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has signed the TPNW

Has not yet ratified the TPNW

[HIGHLIGHTS]

Signed: 20 September 2017

 

Summary

Peru has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW).

 

Signature

Antonio García Revilla, the director-general of multilateral and global affairs at the foreign ministry of Peru, signed the TPNW when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017.

In September 2020, the president of Peru, Martín Vizcarra, announced in a video message to the UN General Assembly that Peru is in the process of ratifying the treaty, “convinced that the prohibition of nuclear weapons and tests continues to be a moral imperative for the planet and the human species”.

Addressing the UN General Assembly in September 2021, the minister of foreign affairs of Peru, Óscar Maúrtua, hailed the TPNW’s entry into force as a “great achievement” and “a legal and moral starting point on a long road to achieve nuclear disarmament”.

Maúrtua added that Peru “has been making every effort for [the TPNW’s] prompt ratification”. The foreign affairs committee of the Peruvian congress approved ratification of the TPNW in July 2021. A plenary decision of the congress is pending.

Antonio García Revilla, a director-general at the foreign ministry of Peru, signs the TPNW in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

 

Universalisation

Peru has promoted universal adherence to the TPNW, including by co-sponsoring and consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the United Nations in 2017, Peru said that it hopes “that all states possessing [nuclear] weapons will join this instrument”.

 

TPNW negotiations

Peru participated in the negotiation of the TPNW at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and was among 122 states that voted in favour of its adoption.

In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Peru said: “What does not exist cannot cause harm. Nuclear weapons simply should not exist.”

It expressed regret in its closing statement that the final treaty text did not contain an explicit prohibition on the transit of nuclear weapons through areas under a state’s jurisdiction, but it accepted that “in a process like this it is impossible to cover the concerns of all states”.

In 2016, Peru co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

 

Before the negotiations

Peru was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

[PARTNERS]

[LOCALSUPPORT]