Malaysia

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has joined the TPNW

Signed: 20 September 2017

Ratified: 30 September 2020

 

Summary

Malaysia has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Signature and ratification

Anifah Aman, the then-minister for foreign affairs of Malaysia, signed the treaty when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017.

In an address to the United Nations that same week, he said: “We are convinced that the political and legal impact of this treaty will steer the international community collectively towards the elimination of nuclear weapons.”

He added that the treaty is “legally sound [and] feasible to implement” and “sends a powerful political message that nuclear weapons are categorically unacceptable”.


Anifah Aman, the then-minister of foreign affairs of Malaysia, signs the treaty in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

On 30 September 2020, Hishammuddin Hussein, the minister of foreign affairs, signed the instrument of ratification at a ceremony in the nation’s capital, Kuala Lumpur. It was deposited with the UN secretary-general later that day.

“By joining, Malaysia is contributing to the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons,” he said. “We are proud to have contributed to this important treaty, and we encourage other states to expedite their ratifications,” he added.

Malaysia was the 46th state to ratify or accede to the treaty.

Hishammuddin Hussein, the minister of foreign affairs of Malaysia, signs the instrument of ratification on 30 September 2020. Credit: Malaysia MFA

 

Universalisation

Malaysia has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring and consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the United Nations in September 2019, Malaysia said that the treaty “complements and strengthens the nuclear disarmament architecture” and urged “all states to have an open and focused approach towards this treaty”.

 

Treaty negotiations

Malaysia participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and was among 122 states that voted in favour of its adoption.

In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Malaysia said that “our work here would have a political as well as a legal impact on the disarmament debate” and give impetus to the movement to attain and maintain a nuclear-weapon-free world.

In 2016, Malaysia co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

 

Before the negotiations

Malaysia was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

Ron McCoy, a Malaysian doctor who helped establish ICAN in 2007, speaks at a campaign meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2016. Photo: ICAN

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has joined the TPNW

[HIGHLIGHTS]

Signed: 20 September 2017

Ratified: 30 September 2020

 

Summary

Malaysia has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Signature and ratification

Anifah Aman, the then-minister for foreign affairs of Malaysia, signed the treaty when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017.

In an address to the United Nations that same week, he said: “We are convinced that the political and legal impact of this treaty will steer the international community collectively towards the elimination of nuclear weapons.”

He added that the treaty is “legally sound [and] feasible to implement” and “sends a powerful political message that nuclear weapons are categorically unacceptable”.


Anifah Aman, the then-minister of foreign affairs of Malaysia, signs the treaty in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

On 30 September 2020, Hishammuddin Hussein, the minister of foreign affairs, signed the instrument of ratification at a ceremony in the nation’s capital, Kuala Lumpur. It was deposited with the UN secretary-general later that day.

“By joining, Malaysia is contributing to the goal of a world free of nuclear weapons,” he said. “We are proud to have contributed to this important treaty, and we encourage other states to expedite their ratifications,” he added.

Malaysia was the 46th state to ratify or accede to the treaty.

Hishammuddin Hussein, the minister of foreign affairs of Malaysia, signs the instrument of ratification on 30 September 2020. Credit: Malaysia MFA

 

Universalisation

Malaysia has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring and consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the United Nations in September 2019, Malaysia said that the treaty “complements and strengthens the nuclear disarmament architecture” and urged “all states to have an open and focused approach towards this treaty”.

 

Treaty negotiations

Malaysia participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and was among 122 states that voted in favour of its adoption.

In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Malaysia said that “our work here would have a political as well as a legal impact on the disarmament debate” and give impetus to the movement to attain and maintain a nuclear-weapon-free world.

In 2016, Malaysia co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

 

Before the negotiations

Malaysia was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

Ron McCoy, a Malaysian doctor who helped establish ICAN in 2007, speaks at a campaign meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2016. Photo: ICAN

[PARTNERS]

Physicians for Peace and Social Responsibility

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ECOKNIGHTS

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SEDAR Institute

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[LOCALSUPPORT]