Liechtenstein

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has signed the TPNW

Has not yet ratified the TPNW

Signed: 20 September 2017

 

Summary

Liechtenstein has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Signature and ratification

Aurelia Frick, the then-minister of foreign affairs of Liechtenstein, signed the treaty when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017.

Addressing the United Nations following the signing ceremony, she said: “No doubt, it will take time to see the effects of the treaty on nuclear stockpiles. But setting a number of important legal benchmarks that will become binding norms is great progress.”

In a statement to the United Nations in October 2020, Liechtenstein said that it “strongly supports the collective effort to outlaw nuclear weapons and is committed to ratifying the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons ... at the earliest possibility”.

In response to questions raised in the Landtag, or parliament, the minister of foreign affairs, Katrin Eggenberger, said in June 2020 that the government was working to address matters related to a customs union with Switzerland before completing the ratification process.

Aurelia Frick, the then-minister of foreign affairs of Liechtenstein, signs the treaty in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

 

Universalisation

Liechtenstein has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring and consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the United Nations in 2019, Liechtenstein said that the treaty “draws a legal line against all attempts to justify the use of nuclear weapons” and is “a sole beacon of hope and a lesson for multilateralism in a world increasingly suffering from unsustainable big power politics”.

 

Treaty negotiations

Liechtenstein participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and was among 122 states that voted in favour of its adoption.

In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Liechtenstein said that the treaty-making process was “truly of historic nature”, and commented that the “broad and high-level representation here today shows strong political support for this process”.

Responding to the decision of certain states not to “join the negotiating table”, Liechtenstein noted that “throughout history those who are comfortable with the status quo rarely advocate for change”. It expressed confidence that “the movement towards the universal prohibition of nuclear weapons will persist and succeed”.

In its closing statement, Liechtenstein remarked: “The most devastating weapons of all are prohibited by a legally binding instrument open to all states. For Liechtenstein, it was an honour to participate in this joint undertaking.”

In 2016, Liechtenstein co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

Christian Wenaweser, the permanent representative of Liechtenstein to the United Nations, delivers a statement during the treaty negotiations in June 2017. Photo: ICAN

 

Before the negotiations

Liechtenstein was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

Nuclear-weapon-free state

Has signed the TPNW

Has not yet ratified the TPNW

[HIGHLIGHTS]

Signed: 20 September 2017

 

Summary

Liechtenstein has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Signature and ratification

Aurelia Frick, the then-minister of foreign affairs of Liechtenstein, signed the treaty when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017.

Addressing the United Nations following the signing ceremony, she said: “No doubt, it will take time to see the effects of the treaty on nuclear stockpiles. But setting a number of important legal benchmarks that will become binding norms is great progress.”

In a statement to the United Nations in October 2020, Liechtenstein said that it “strongly supports the collective effort to outlaw nuclear weapons and is committed to ratifying the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons ... at the earliest possibility”.

In response to questions raised in the Landtag, or parliament, the minister of foreign affairs, Katrin Eggenberger, said in June 2020 that the government was working to address matters related to a customs union with Switzerland before completing the ratification process.

Aurelia Frick, the then-minister of foreign affairs of Liechtenstein, signs the treaty in New York on 20 September 2017. Photo: ICAN

 

Universalisation

Liechtenstein has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring and consistently voting in favour of an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

In a statement to the United Nations in 2019, Liechtenstein said that the treaty “draws a legal line against all attempts to justify the use of nuclear weapons” and is “a sole beacon of hope and a lesson for multilateralism in a world increasingly suffering from unsustainable big power politics”.

 

Treaty negotiations

Liechtenstein participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and was among 122 states that voted in favour of its adoption.

In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Liechtenstein said that the treaty-making process was “truly of historic nature”, and commented that the “broad and high-level representation here today shows strong political support for this process”.

Responding to the decision of certain states not to “join the negotiating table”, Liechtenstein noted that “throughout history those who are comfortable with the status quo rarely advocate for change”. It expressed confidence that “the movement towards the universal prohibition of nuclear weapons will persist and succeed”.

In its closing statement, Liechtenstein remarked: “The most devastating weapons of all are prohibited by a legally binding instrument open to all states. For Liechtenstein, it was an honour to participate in this joint undertaking.”

In 2016, Liechtenstein co-sponsored the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

Christian Wenaweser, the permanent representative of Liechtenstein to the United Nations, delivers a statement during the treaty negotiations in June 2017. Photo: ICAN

 

Before the negotiations

Liechtenstein was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

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