China

Nuclear-armed state

Possesses 320 nuclear weapons

Has not yet joined the TPNW

Summary

China has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Nuclear-weapon programme

China possesses approximately 320 nuclear weapons, which it can launch from missiles, submarines, and aircraft. Between 1964 and 1996, it conducted 45 nuclear tests on its territory.

 

National position

China has consistently voted against an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that welcomes the adoption of the treaty and calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to it “at the earliest possible date”.

Along with other nuclear-armed states, China has said that it does not accept any claim that [the treaty] contributes to the development of customary international law”. It has called on all states that are considering supporting the the treaty to reflect seriously on its implications for international peace and security.

In October 2020, with the treaty’s entry into force imminent, China said that it has always been advocating complete prohibition and thorough destruction of nuclear weapons, which is fundamentally in line with purposes of [treaty].

 

Treaty negotiations

China did not participate in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In 2016, China abstained from voting on the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

Nuclear-armed state

Possesses 320 nuclear weapons

Has not yet joined the TPNW

[HIGHLIGHTS]

Summary

China has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

 

Nuclear-weapon programme

China possesses approximately 320 nuclear weapons, which it can launch from missiles, submarines, and aircraft. Between 1964 and 1996, it conducted 45 nuclear tests on its territory.

 

National position

China has consistently voted against an annual UN General Assembly resolution since 2018 that welcomes the adoption of the treaty and calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to it “at the earliest possible date”.

Along with other nuclear-armed states, China has said that it does not accept any claim that [the treaty] contributes to the development of customary international law”. It has called on all states that are considering supporting the the treaty to reflect seriously on its implications for international peace and security.

In October 2020, with the treaty’s entry into force imminent, China said that it has always been advocating complete prohibition and thorough destruction of nuclear weapons, which is fundamentally in line with purposes of [treaty].

 

Treaty negotiations

China did not participate in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and thus did not vote on its adoption.

In 2016, China abstained from voting on the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence negotiations on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

[PARTNERS]

Humanist Association of Hong Kong

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International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (China)

[LOCALSUPPORT]