Pages tagged "Latin America and the Caribbean"



  • Cuba

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

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    Cuba has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Bruno Rodríguez Parrilla, the minister for foreign affairs of Cuba, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. Anayansi Rodríguez Camejo, the permanent representative of Cuba to the United Nations, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 30 January 2018.

    Addressing the United Nations after the signing ceremony in September 2017, Rodríguez said: “We all share the common responsibility to preserve the existence of human beings in the face of a nuclear threat. An important contribution to the achievement of that goal was the historic adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.”

    Cuba participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

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    Cuba has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”. Cuba has called for the ratification of the treaty “in order to achieve its prompt entry into force”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Cuba said that the ultimate objective of the treaty “must be the total elimination of nuclear weapons”, which is “even more relevant in the current context” of global insecurity and lack of progress in nuclear disarmament.

    In 2016, Cuba voted in favour of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Cuba was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Cuba is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

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    Cuban Medical Committee for Global Survival 

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    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Dominican Republic

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Voted in favour of adopting TPNW

    Has signed TPNW, but not yet ratified

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    The Dominican Republic has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Miguel Vargas, the minister for foreign affairs of the Dominican Republic, signed the treaty on 7 June 2018.

    The Dominican Republic participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

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    The Dominican Republic has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, the Dominican Republic said that the “historical starting point” for the adoption of measures to prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons should be the inter-generational human suffering caused by such weapons.

    In 2016, the Dominican Republic was an additional co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    The Dominican Republic was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    The Dominican Republic is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


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    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

     

  • Colombia

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Voted in favour of adopting TPNW

    Has signed TPNW, but not yet ratified

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Colombia has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Francisco González, the then-deputy permanent representative of Colombia to the United Nations, signed the treaty on 3 August 2018. 

    Colombia participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

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    Colombia voted in favour of a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that welcomed the adoption of the treaty and called upon “all states that have not yet done so to sign, ratify, accept, approve, or accede to the treaty at the earliest possible date”.

    In a working paper submitted to the negotiating conference, Colombia set out suggested principles, objectives, and preambular elements for the treaty.

    In 2016, Colombia voted in favour of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Colombia was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Colombia is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


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    Columbian Campaign to Ban Landmines 

    website

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

     

  • Chile

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Voted in favour of adopting TPNW

    Has signed TPNW, but not yet ratified

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Chile has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Michelle Bachelet, the then-president of Chile, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. 

    Chile participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

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    Chile has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Chile said that the treaty-making process had come about as a result of the determined efforts of civil society and “a coalition of peace-loving states that do not want to remain indifferent to the humanitarian consequences of a possible use of nuclear weapons”.

    In 2016, Chile was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Chile was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Chile is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


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    CEHUM-Aletheia

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    Instituto de Ecologia Politica

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    Support for TPNW in Chile Get involved with ICAN in Chile ›

    Parliamentary Pledge

    These are the elected officials that have taken the ICAN Parliamentary Pledge to support and promote the TPNW:

    →Tomás Hirsch MP
    →Alejandra Sepúlveda MP
    →Félix González MP
    →Florcita Alarcón MP
    →Gael Yeomans MP
    →Guillermo Teillier MP
    →Gonzalo Winter MP
    →Jorge Elias Brito MP
    →Camila Rojas MP
    →Amaro Labra Sepúlveda MP
    →Alejandro Bernales MP
    →Alexis Sepúlveda MP
    →Carlos Abel Jarpa MP
    →Juan Ignacio Latorre MP
    →Maite Orsini MP
    →Marisela Santibáñez MP
    →Marcela Hernando MP
    →Miguel Crispi MP
    →Pablo Vidal MP
    →Pamela Jiles MP
    →Pepe Auth MP
    →Tucapel Jiménez MP
    →Renato Garin MP
    →Vlado Mirosevic MP

  • Costa Rica

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Costa Rica has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. 

    Luis Guillermo Solís, the then-president of Costa Rica, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. Elayne Whyte, the permanent representative of Costa Rica to the United Nations in Geneva, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 5 July 2018.

    Addressing the United Nations ahead of the signing ceremony in September 2017, Solís said: “This treaty is a strong message that most UN member states do not support, do not accept, and do not consider nuclear weapons as legitimate, and that the international community clearly states that nuclear weapons are not only immoral, but are henceforth illegal.”

    Costa Rica participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

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    Costa Rica photo 2Costa Rica has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In a statement to the United Nations in September 2019, the president of Costa Rica, Carlos Alvarado Quesada, said that “the treaty bolsters the political standard-setting, humanitarian and legal imperatives of nuclear disarmament, which are the prime objective of this organisation”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Costa Rica described the task at hand as being “to fill the existing legal void” and “to add to international law a chapter that should have been written long ago”.

    Elayne Whyte Gómez served as president of the negotiating conference. Upon gavelling through the treaty on the final day of the conference, she remarked: “We have managed to sow the first seeds of a world free of nuclear weapons.”

    Elayne Whyte-Gomez chairs TPNW negotiationsIn 2016, Costa Rica was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Costa Rica was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.


    Costa Rica is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

     

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    International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Costa Rica)

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    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

     

  • Bolivia

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Bolivia has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Evo Morales, the then-president of Bolivia, signed the treaty on 16 April 2018. Sacha Sergio Llorentty Solíz, the permanent representative of Bolivia to the United Nations, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 6 August 2019.

    Bolivia participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption. 

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    Bolivia chose to ratify the treaty on 6 August, the anniversary of the US atomic bombing of Hiroshima, so as not to forget those who lost their lives in the attack.

    Bolivia has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In 2016, Bolivia voted in favour of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Bolivia was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Bolivia is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


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    Bolivian Women's Efforts

    website

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Argentina

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Voted to adopt TPNW

    has not yet signed TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Argentina has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Argentina participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

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    In a statement to the United Nations in September 2019, Argentina said that it shares “the spirit underlying the treaty” and is “analysing the impact of the treaty on other important spheres of the current regime in regards to non-proliferation and peaceful uses of nuclear energy”.

    Argentina abstained from voting on a UN General Assembly resolution in 2018 that welcomed the adoption of the treaty and called upon “all states that have not yet done so to sign, ratify, accept, approve, or accede to the treaty at the earliest possible date”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Argentina said that it “participates in this negotiation process convinced that it is an initiative that will lead to a new international standard”.

    In 2016, Argentina voted in favour of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Argentina was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Argentina is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

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    Argentine Physicians and Health Professionals for the Prevention of Nuclear War

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    Asociación para Políticas Publicas (APP)

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    Get involved in getting support for the TPNW in Argentina

    ICAN Parliamentary Appeal

    These elected Parliamentarians in Argentina have pledged to support and promote the TPNW:

    Marcos Cleri MP

     

     

  • Mexico

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Mexico has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Luis Videgaray Caso, the then-secretary of foreign affairs of Mexico, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. Miguel Ruíz Cabañas, the assistant secretary for multilateral affairs and human rights, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 16 January 2018.

    Mexico participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

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    In an address to the United Nations following the signing ceremony in September 2017, Videgaray said that Mexico had signed the treaty because “the existence of nuclear weapons poses a threat to the whole of humanity”.

    The Mexican senate gave its unanimous approval for ratification in November 2017.

    Mexico has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In a statement to the United Nations in September 2019, Mexico encouraged all states that have not yet ratified the treaty “to speed up their respective processes”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Mexico described the treaty as “a global extension of the various treaties that establish zones free of nuclear weapons” and expressed hope that “the collective will of the international community” convinces nuclear-armed states, in the near future, to adhere to the treaty.

    Mexico, Austria, Brazil, Ireland, Nigeria, and South Africa comprised a “core group” of states that played a leading role in bringing the negotiations about and ensuring their ultimate success. 

    In 2016, Mexico was an initiator and co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Mexico was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    In 2014, Mexico hosted the second in a series of inter-governmental conferences on the “humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons”, in the state of Nayarit. The Mexican chair of the conference, Juan Gómez Robledo, concluded that a diplomatic process must be launched for the prohibition of nuclear weapons.

    The Nayarit conference helped cement the idea that the prohibition of nuclear weapons is a necessary precondition for their elimination, based on experience with other types of indiscriminate weapons. It was hailed as “a point of no return” in the process to outlaw nuclear weapons.


    Mexico is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

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    Latin American Circle of International Studies

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    Mexican Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War 

    website

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Caribbean experts gathered to explore region’s role in supporting the NuclearBan Treaty

    On June 19th and 20th, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Guyana and ICAN convened a Caribbean Regional Forum on the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons to take stock of the Treaty from a regional perspective, and to canvas progress for the early signature and ratification by all countries in the region.

     

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