Pages tagged "Latin America and the Caribbean"



  • Venezuela

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Participated in the TPNW negotiations

    Has yet signed and ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Venezuela has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Jorge Arreaza, the minister for foreign affairs of Venezuela, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. Samuel Moncada, the permanent representative of Venezuela to the United Nations, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 27 March 2018.

    In an address to the United Nations following the signing ceremony in September 2017, Arreaza said that Venezuela had chosen to sign the treaty because it strongly opposes “the existence of nuclear weapons on our planet”, which “presents to humanity unjustifiable and unimaginable anguish and risks”.

    Venezuela participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS] [COLLAPSE_O]

    Venezuela has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In October 2019, it encouraged “countries that have not signed or ratified [the treaty] to join this important effort to strengthen the disarmament and non-proliferation regime”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Venezuela said that “we hope together to achieve a solid and robust final document that prohibits nuclear weapons as a preliminary step to their total and complete elimination”.

    In 2016, Venezuela was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Venezuela was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Venezuela is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]


    No local partner organisations


    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Peru

    Nuclear-weapon free state

    Participated in TPNW negotiations

    Has signed TPNW, but not yet ratified

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Peru has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Antonio García Revilla, the director-general of multilateral and global affairs at the foreign ministry of Peru, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. 

    Peru participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS] [COLLAPSE_O]

    In a statement to the United Nations in October 2019, Peru said that it signed the treaty because the use of nuclear weapons “constitutes a crime against humanity and a serious violation of international law” and would have “catastrophic consequences for all humanity”.

    It said in September 2019 that “this legally binding instrument will not detract from the current disarmament and non-proliferation regime; on the contrary, it will strengthen and complement it”.

    Peru has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In a statement to the United Nations in September 2017, Peru said that it hopes “that all states possessing [nuclear] weapons will join this instrument”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Peru said: “What does not exist cannot cause harm. Nuclear weapons simply should not exist.”

    In 2016, Peru was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Peru was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Peru is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    No local partner organisations.

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Panama

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Panama has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Isabel Saint Malo, the then-vice-president and minister for foreign affairs of Panama, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. Melitón Alejandro Arrocha Ruíz, the permanent representative of Panama to the United Nations, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 11 April 2019.

    Panama participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS] [COLLAPSE_O]

    Panama has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    Panama participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    In 2016, Panama was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Panama was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Panama is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    No local partner organisations


    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Haiti

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Voted in favour of adopting TPNW

    Has not yet joined TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Haiti has not yet signed or ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Haiti participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS]
    [COLLAPSE_O]

    In 2016, Haiti was absent for the vote on the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Haiti was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Haiti is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.[COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    No local partner organisations

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Ecuador

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Ecuador has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Lenin Moreno Garcés, the president of Ecuador, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017, and called on “all countries to subscribe to this historic international instrument”. José Valencia, the minister for foreign affairs of Ecuador, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 25 September 2019.

    Ecuador participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.


    [PARTNERS]
    [COLLAPSE_O]

    Ecuador has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In a statement to the United Nations in October 2019, Ecuador said that the “best tribute” that states can pay to the victims of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is to sign and ratify the treaty. 

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Educador said that “the prohibition and elimination of nuclear weapons has been a constant priority [for Ecuador] for more than seven decades”.

    In 2016, Ecuador was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Ecuador was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Ecuador is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


    [COLLAPSE_C]


    [PARTNERS]


    No local partner organisations 


    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Uruguay

    Nuclear-weapon free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Uruguay has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. 

    Elbio Rosselli, the then-permanent representative of Uruguay to the United Nations, signed the treaty when it opened for signature on 20 September 2017. He deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 25 July 2018.

    In an address to the United Nations following the signing ceremony in September 2017, the minister for foreign affairs of Uruguay, Rodolfo Nin Novoa, called on “all countries to sign this instrument, which aims to ensure a decent life for future generations and avoid a humanitarian catastrophe”. 

    Uruguay participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS] [COLLAPSE_O]

    Uruguay has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In a statement to the United Nations in September 2019, Uruguay urged “all states who have not yet done so to accede and ratify”. 

    In 2016, Uruguay was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Uruguay was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Uruguay is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

     

    Mr. Elbio Rosselli, Permanent Representative of Uruguay signs the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

    Mr. Elbio Rosselli, Permanent Representative of Uruguay signs the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    Asociación de Lucha para el Desarme Civil

    website


    International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War 

    website

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get countries on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge in Uruguay. 

  • Nicaragua

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Nicaragua has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Maria Rubiales de Chamorro, the vice-minister for foreign affairs and permanent representative of Nicaragua to the United Nations, signed the treaty on 22 September 2017. She deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 19 July 2018.

    Nicaragua participated in the negotiation of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons at the United Nations in New York in 2017 but was absent for the vote on its adoption.

    [PARTNERS]
    [COLLAPSE_O]

    Nicaragua has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In 2016, Nicaragua abstained from voting on the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Nicaragua was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Nicaragua is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    Nicaraguan Society of Physicians for Peace and Defense of Life 

    website

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

     

  • Honduras

    Nuclear-weapon free state

    Voted in favour of adopting TPNW

    Has signed TPNW, but not yet ratified

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Honduras has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Marïa Dolores Agüero Lara, the then-minister for foreign affairs of Honduras, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. 

    Honduras participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS]
    [COLLAPSE_O]

    Honduras has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In 2016, Honduras was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Honduras was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Honduras is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.

    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    Región Latinoamericana de la Organización Mundial de Personas con Discapacidad (RLOMPD) 

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

  • Guatemala

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Voted in favour of adopting TPNW

    Has signed TPNW, but not yet ratified

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    Guatemala has signed but not yet ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Sandra Erica Jovel Polanco, the minister for foreign affairs of Guatemala, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. The government announced in October 2019 that it is in the “final stage” of ratifying the treaty. 

    Guatemala participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS]
    [COLLAPSE_O]

    Addressing the United Nations ahead of the signing ceremony in September 2017, the president of Guatemala, Jimmy Morales, described the treaty as “an important step towards a world free of nuclear weapons” and said that “collective security can only be achieved through the prohibition and total elimination of nuclear weapons”.

    Guatemala has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    In its opening statement to the negotiating conference, Guatemala expressed strong support for the “historic process”, which “is the result of tireless efforts and unwavering political will on the part of a growing majority of states”.

    In 2016, Guatemala was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    Guatemala was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    Guatemala is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    Association of Guatemalan Physicians and Scientists for the Prevention of War 

    website


    EPCAT

    website

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.

     

  • El Salvador

    Nuclear-weapon-free state

    Has signed the TPNW

    Has ratified the TPNW

    [HIGHLIGHTS]

    El Salvador has signed and ratified the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

    Hugo Martínez, the then-minister for foreign affairs of El Salvador, signed the treaty on 20 September 2017. Rubén Escalante, the then-permanent representative of El Salvador to the United Nations, deposited the country’s instrument of ratification with the UN secretary-general on 30 January 2019.

    El Salvador participated in the negotiation of the treaty at the United Nations in New York in 2017 and voted in favour of its adoption.

    [PARTNERS]
    [COLLAPSE_O]

    El Salvador has promoted universal adherence to the treaty, including by co-sponsoring a UN General Assembly resolution in 2019 that calls upon all states to sign, ratify, or accede to the treaty “at the earliest possible date”.

    It has called “on the international community to join this effort, accelerating all internal processes to adhere to this treaty and achieve its entry into force as soon as possible”.

    In 2016, El Salvador was a co-sponsor of the UN General Assembly resolution that established the formal mandate for states to commence the negotiations in 2017 on “a legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons, leading towards their total elimination”.

    El Salvador was among 127 states that endorsed a “humanitarian pledge” in 2015–16 to cooperate “in efforts to stigmatise, prohibit, and eliminate nuclear weapons”. The pledge was instrumental in building momentum and support for convening the negotiations.

    El Salvador is a state party to the 1967 Treaty of Tlatelolco, which established Latin America and the Caribbean as a nuclear-weapon-free zone.


    [COLLAPSE_C]

    [PARTNERS]

    Salvadorian Physicians for Social Responsibility 

    website


    Survivors Network and People with Disability Foundation

    website

    [LOCALSUPPORT]

    Get involved. Help get this country on board with the TPNW>

    There are currently no elected representatives or local or regional bodies in this country committed to supporting the TPNW through the ICAN Cities Appeal or ICAN Parliamentary Pledge. Find out what you can do to support the TPNW in this country.